Tuesday Seminar Series

The Linguistics Department Tuesday Seminar is held in Saunders 541 at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa from 12:00pm to 1:15PM every Tuesday in both Fall and Spring semesters.

Any topic related to linguistics is welcome. The seminar coordinator are Thomas Kettig, Noella Handley and Jacob Hakim with the assistance of Gary Holton.  If you are interested in giving a talk or would like further information, please contact Thomas Kettig, Noella Handley or Jacob Hakim.

November 2018

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  • [TS] Ashleigh Surma; Danielle Yarbrough; Ryan Henke (PhD Students, Linguistics Dept.)
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13-Nov-2018
  • [TS] Ashleigh Surma; Danielle Yarbrough; Ryan Henke (PhD Students, Linguistics Dept.)

    13-Nov-2018  12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    Saunders Hall, Room 541, 2424 Maile Way, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA

    Abstract for Talk 1 by Ashleigh Surma ( Linguistic Investigation of Dene Dháh: Field Report ):
    This talk will discuss my first fieldwork trip to Alberta, Canada and the process of collecting interviews from speakers of Dene Dháh. Dene Dháh is the language of the Dene Tha' First Nation and is primarily spoken in three communities in northern Alberta: Chateh, Bushe River, and Meander River. Dene Dháh is unique in that it maintains a relatively high level of linguistic vitality. Many adults age 30+ still speak the language fluently, though most children have only passive knowledge of the language. In this talk, I will describe my experiences "in the field" and discuss prospects for future research.



    Abstract for Talk 2 by Dannii Yarbrough ( Language Assessments with the Niitsípuwahsin Immersion School in the Aamsskáápipikuni Nation):This presentation will provide a preliminary report of my summer fieldwork with the Cuts Wood immersion school in the Aamsskáápipikuni (Blackfeet) Nation. The Aamsskáápipikuni are the southernmost band of the Blackfoot Confederacy and is located in Northwestern Montana. The Niitsípuwahsin language is critically endangered and this limits the amount of language exposure the children of the immersion school have over the course of the summer break. The primary focus of my fieldwork was conducting language assessments to determine if pedagogical games created by the Piegan Institute and Native Teaching Aids help mitigate any language attrition of students’ skills during summer vacation. I will discuss the collaborative process of designing the assessment, successes and challenges discovered while conducting the assessments, and share some preliminary results.

    Abstract for Talk 3 by Ryan Henke ( Working with the Chisasibi Child Language Acquisition Study):
    This presentation reports results from a Bilinski-funded project with the Chisasibi Child Language Acquisition Study (CCLAS), a longitudinal study of the first-language acquisition of Northern East Cree in Chisasibi, Quebec. Most polysynthetic languages of the U.S. and Canada, including Cree and the other members of the Algonquian language family, are both endangered and under-represented in the field of language acquisition. CCLAS fills a crucial scientific gap while also contributing to the documentation of an under-documented and under-described language. This presentation discusses my developing involvement with CCLAS and outcomes from six weeks working with the CCLAS team at Memorial University in St. John's, Newfoundland.

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