Alumni Update: James Grama

Dr. James Grama is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow affiliated with the ARC Centres of Excellence at the Australian National University. He is working on the Sydney Speaks project, which is focused on language variation in Sydney, Australia. He has been with the project since January 2017.

James graduated from our department in 2015. You can read a copy of his dissertation (chaired by Dr. Katie Drager), Variation and Change in Hawai’i Creole Vowels, by clicking on the title. Utilizing similar acoustical analyses, he’s currently investigating features of Australian English and its function in regard to socioeconomic status, network affiliation, and ethnicity.

UH scholars describe local variety of English

Recent work by researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Department of Linguistics and Georgetown University demonstrates that the pronunciation of vowels is a part of what makes Hawai‘i English unique compared with other varieties of English. Hawai‘i English, the name given to the English that is spoken in the islands, is commonly spoken alongside Pidgin/Hawai‘i Creole, and is an understudied variety. This work provides a stepping stone toward our knowledge of the ways that people from Hawai‘i speak. The results of this work were recently published in the Journal of the International Phonetic Association; the full citation is given below.

Kirtley, M. Joelle*, James Grama*, Katie Drager*, and Sean Simpson+ (2016) An acoustic analysis of the vowels of Hawai‘i English. Journal of the International Phonetic Association. doi:10.1017/S0025100315000456.

* The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
+ Georgetown University

Working Papers Vol. 44

  • 44 (1)
    Aragon, Carolina
    Phonetic Realization of Medial Stop Consonants in Akuntsu
    [PDF without audio files]
    [PDF with audio files]-open with Adobe Reader
    January 2013
  • 44 (2)
    Joo, Kum-Jeong
    Universal 20 and Word-Order Variation in Korean [PDF]
    April 2013
  • 44 (3)
    Grama, James
    The Effect of a Single Formant on Dialect Identification [PDF]
    April 2013
  • 44 (4)
    Odango, Emerson
    The Status of Subject and Object Pronominal Elements in Lukunosh Mortlockese [PDF]
    April 2013