Students

Information for Students

The purpose of the Linguistics Beyond the Classroom (LBC) Program is to introduce
you to some of the ways the material you learn in your Linguistics or SLS class relates to
current research that is being conducted in these fields.

The faculty and students of the Department of Linguistics and the Department of
Second Language Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi conduct research on a variety of
topics using a broad range of research methods. Some of this research involves the use of
data collected directly from speakers. This can include recording the speech of a single
person or a small group, having people participate in reading or comprehension experiments,
or asking individuals for their judgments of which sentences sound correct or incorrect in
their native or non-native language.

One of the educational goals for the class you are taking is for students to
understand the types of language-related research that are being conducted and the methods
involved in this research. Understanding current research in the fields of linguistics
and/or second language studies significantly enriches the classroom experience by giving
you hands-on exposure to research techniques, the chance to interact with researchers, or
information on topics beyond what can be covered within classroom lectures. Those of you
who opt to participate in experiments and other research projects can directly contribute
to linguistic research by providing valuable data to the researchers. In addition, learning
about language-related research that is conducted locally can be particularly helpful for
identifying research projects you might wish to initiate or help with, either as a research
assistant to a faculty member or as an independent project such as an honor’s thesis. It
also gives you insight into the process of data collection, which is useful if you continue
in the social sciences, or are interested in topics that make use of survey data, such as
marketing or politics.

Although there are numerous research projects on language conducted at UH, we don’t
do everything here. It is also beneficial to see videos about language and linguistic
research that has been conducted elsewhere. Therefore, students in this class may fulfill
the Linguistics Beyond the Classroom requirement in either of the following ways:

Option 1 (for those 18 and older):

Participate as part of the LBC participant pool in one research project (such as an experiment, survey, or interview),
which will typically last between 30 and 90 minutes, and complete
the associated questionnaire. All research projects will have been approved by the
University of Hawaiʻi Committee on Human Studies.

 

Option 2: (Not available for Unit Mastery students – see the Unit Mastery
materials for more information about LBC options)

Review one media file (or a collection of very short files) related to linguistic research, from the
list approved for this class, and complete a 500-word paper that summarizes the content of
the media and how it relates to what you are learning in class.

How to Participate in the Research Project Options

  1. View the list of research projects by visiting the following webpage:
    http://ling.hawaii.edu/sites/lbc/project-listing/
  2. Sign up for a project by following the instructions on the website.
  3. Go to the project that you have signed up for. After the research activity,
    you will get access to an online questionnaire to fill out to give the researcher feedback and get class credit. A sample questionnaire is provided at the end of
    this page.
  4. Fill in the online questionnaire, which will be automatically submitted to your instructor and the researcher.

How to Participate in the Media Option

  1. Get the list of approved media from your instructor. All media are
    available from Sinclair Library or some other freely available source.
  2. Review the media and write a 500-word paper that summarizes the content of
    the media and explains how it relates to what you’ve been learning in class.
  3. Sign in to this site with your UH email, and submit your completed 500-word summary using the online form. Summaries will not be returned.

Important Information about Research Projects

  • The list of approved research projects may change during the semester, as
    new projects become approved or previously posted projects are completed.
  • Some projects are limited to certain types of people, such as native
    speakers of Japanese, people who have normal hearing, etc. Please read the restrictions
    carefully before signing up.
  • At least one project per semester will be open to all students. However,
    there may be a limited number of participation slots available. If it is not clear
    from the project descriptions, please email Amy
    Schafer
    , who will help you identify an appropriate study for you.
  • Note down the date, time, and place of the project you have signed up for.
    You may not get a reminder — it depends on the researcher. If you cannot make an activity
    you have signed up for, please notify the researcher as soon as possible.

BE ON TIME. If you are late to an activity, you might have to reschedule.
Research project activities are typically scheduled at multiple times of the day, and can include evening and weekend hours.

Questions and Problems

If you have questions about the Linguistics Beyond the Classroom Program, or any
problems with the program, please contact the chair of the Linguistics Beyond the Classroom
committee:

Dr. Amy Schafer, Associate Professor of Linguistics, aschafer@hawaii.edu

If you have questions about the use of human subjects in research, please contact
the University of Hawaiʻi Human Studies Program.

 

EXAMPLE OF THE RESEARCH PROJECT PARTICIPATION QUESTIONNAIRE THAT YOU WILL FILL OUT
AFTER AN ACTIVITY. ONLY ONLINE QUESTIONNAIRES ARE VALID.


Please answer the following questions in a few sentences:

In your own words, what was the researcher trying to find out?

 

Explain one way this research project relates to what you have been learning in
class.

 

What improvements (if any) would you suggest that the researcher make?