First‐Ever Credit Course on Jejueo Taught at a Post‐Secondary Institution

Jejueo, the language of Korea’s Jeju Island, is now being taught for credit in a post‐secondary institution for the first time. The language, long mistakenly classified as a dialect of Korean, is not intelligible to people who speak only Korean and has come to be recognized as a separate language by many linguists and institutions, including UNESCO and the Endangered Language Catalogue at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

In 2017, Dr. Changyong Yang, dean of the College of Language Education at Jeju National University and adjunct professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, was asked to teach a for‐credit course on Jejueo in the Department of Nursing at the Jeju Tourism University (제주관광대학교). The goal of the course was to prepare nursing students to better serve the needs of elderly patients who prefer to communicate with health care providers in Jejueo rather than Korean.

Reaction to the course has been very positive. The students have expressed amazement at how different Jejueo is from Korean and how important familiarity with the language has been for communicating with elderly patients. About forty students registered for Dr. Yang’s class in the spring of 2017 and about sixty in the spring of the following year. The course will be offered again in the spring of 2019.

Dr. Yang is using as his textbook the first volume of a Jejueo‐language series that he has co‐authored with Sejung Yang, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, and William O’Grady, a professor in the same department. Preparation of the volumes in the series has been supported by the Core University Program for Korean Studies through the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the Korean Studies Promotion Service of the Academy of Korean Studies (AKS‐2015‐OLU‐2250005).

Original publication from Center for Korean Studies News.

Oxford Handbook of Endangered Languages

The Oxford Handbook of Endangered Languages is now out, edited by our very own Kenneth L.  Rehg and Lyle Campbell. This influential and highly prestigious volume contains contributions by no less than 18 of our current or former students/faculty. It’s fair to say that our department’s perspective on endangered languages is very well represented. Congratulations to all!
List of contributors with University of Hawaii affiliations:
Belew, Anna
Berez-Kroeker, Andrea
Camp, Amber
Campbell, Lyle
Chen, Victoria
Dunn, Christopher
Henke, Ryan
Holton, Gary
Lee, Nala
Magnunson, Matthew
O’Grady, William
Okura, Eve
Rarrick, Samantha
Rehg, Kenneth L.
Simpson, Sean
Tang, Apay
Thieberger, Nick
Van Way, John

Berez-Kroeker, McDonnell & Koller to edit 1st MIT Open Handbook in Linguistics

Three (3) Department of Linguistics researchers: Associate Professor Berez-Kroeker, Assistant Professor Brad McDonnell, and Postdoctoral Research Eve Koller, have a contract to edit the first volume in the new series of Open Handbooks in Linguistics by MIT Press Open. Their volume, called “The Open Handbook of Linguistic Data Management,” will be available for free download. They will be joined by a 4th editor, Dr. Lauren Collister, from University of Pittsburgh.

Ka Leo Features New ASL Course

Ka Leo (also known as Manoa Now), the student-run campus newspaper, featured an article on our new ASL course for Fall 2018 taught by incoming Ph.D. student Emily Jo Noschese. Dr. Kamil Deen and Dr. James ‘Woody’ Woodward were both featured as interviewees, and discussed the current KCC offerings, HCC’s new course, and the potential future for ASL and HSL in the UH System.

To read the article, please visit http://bit.ly/UHMASL18.