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Presentation at Sociolinguistics Symposium 22 in Auckland, New Zealand

Thomas Kettig, co-authoring with Prof. Katie Drager, presented “The social meaning of TRAP-backing in Montréal English” at Sociolinguistics Symposium 22 in Auckland, New Zealand, in June. He was also invited to present a compilation of his research, “Peripherality and representations: A safari through the English low vowels” at the Australian National University in Canberra in May and at the New Zealand Institute for Language and Brain Behaviour in Christchurch in June.

Anna Belew (PhD Candidate) and Colleague Sammy Mbipite Awarded Grant from Endangered Language Fund

Anna Belew and her colleague Sammy Mbipite were awarded a grant from the Endangered Language Fund to launch Iyasa Éboó, a language revitalization project in Campo, Cameroon. The project kicked off with a two-week workshop taught by Anna and Sammy in August 2018, in which 16 Iyasa young people learned basic techniques of language documentation such as making audio recordings; how to use computers to copy, edit, and transcribe their audio recordings; and how to read and write the new Iyasa alphabet. They are using these skills to produce a youth-authored Iyasa-language magazine called Iyasa Éboó (“Iyasa forward!”), which will be distributed throughout the Iyasa community in Campo. The project aims to support language revitalization among young people, strengthen their connection to their language and culture, and create reading materials for the Iyasa community to enjoy and take pride in. Anna and Sammy will present a paper on the project at ICLDC6.

Gary Holton in the news: Biocultural Diversity

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Biocultural Initiative of the Pacific, a knowledge center and network linking scholars, instructors and students who share the common goal of thinking holistically to enhance understanding of biocultural systems, is now part of a new, multi-university project that will explore how to make interdisciplinary research more effective and impactful for students and communities, with a focus on sustainability science.

The two-year research project is funded with a $500,000 grant from the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative (NAKFI), and includes 12 universities from across the United States, United Kingdom and Canada. It is one of three winners of the new NAKFI Challenge competition, chosen from a field of 79 proposals.

UH Mānoa professors Tamara Ticktin, Davianna Pōmaikaʻi McGregor, Alexander Mawyer and Gary Holton serve as co-directors of the UH Mānoa Biocultural Initiative of the Pacific.

For more information, please visit University of Hawaiʿi at Mānoa News.

First‐Ever Credit Course on Jejueo Taught at a Post‐Secondary Institution

Jejueo, the language of Korea’s Jeju Island, is now being taught for credit in a post‐secondary institution for the first time. The language, long mistakenly classified as a dialect of Korean, is not intelligible to people who speak only Korean and has come to be recognized as a separate language by many linguists and institutions, including UNESCO and the Endangered Language Catalogue at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

In 2017, Dr. Changyong Yang, dean of the College of Language Education at Jeju National University and adjunct professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, was asked to teach a for‐credit course on Jejueo in the Department of Nursing at the Jeju Tourism University (제주관광대학교). The goal of the course was to prepare nursing students to better serve the needs of elderly patients who prefer to communicate with health care providers in Jejueo rather than Korean.

Reaction to the course has been very positive. The students have expressed amazement at how different Jejueo is from Korean and how important familiarity with the language has been for communicating with elderly patients. About forty students registered for Dr. Yang’s class in the spring of 2017 and about sixty in the spring of the following year. The course will be offered again in the spring of 2019.

Dr. Yang is using as his textbook the first volume of a Jejueo‐language series that he has co‐authored with Sejung Yang, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, and William O’Grady, a professor in the same department. Preparation of the volumes in the series has been supported by the Core University Program for Korean Studies through the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the Korean Studies Promotion Service of the Academy of Korean Studies (AKS‐2015‐OLU‐2250005).

Original publication from Center for Korean Studies News.

Oxford Handbook of Endangered Languages

The Oxford Handbook of Endangered Languages is now out, edited by our very own Kenneth L.  Rehg and Lyle Campbell. This influential and highly prestigious volume contains contributions by no less than 18 of our current or former students/faculty. It’s fair to say that our department’s perspective on endangered languages is very well represented. Congratulations to all!
List of contributors with University of Hawaii affiliations:
Belew, Anna
Berez-Kroeker, Andrea
Camp, Amber
Campbell, Lyle
Chen, Victoria
Dunn, Christopher
Henke, Ryan
Holton, Gary
Lee, Nala
Magnunson, Matthew
O’Grady, William
Okura, Eve
Rarrick, Samantha
Rehg, Kenneth L.
Simpson, Sean
Tang, Apay
Thieberger, Nick
Van Way, John

Berez-Kroeker, McDonnell & Koller to edit 1st MIT Open Handbook in Linguistics

Three (3) Department of Linguistics researchers: Associate Professor Berez-Kroeker, Assistant Professor Brad McDonnell, and Postdoctoral Research Eve Koller, have a contract to edit the first volume in the new series of Open Handbooks in Linguistics by MIT Press Open. Their volume, called “The Open Handbook of Linguistic Data Management,” will be available for free download. They will be joined by a 4th editor, Dr. Lauren Collister, from University of Pittsburgh.