News Submission Form

Do you have any news to post? For example, any recent conference presentations, article publications, general Linguistic news articles related to Hawaii, etc.?

If so, use our new Submission Form to submit a post for review and future posting! Please allow up to three (3) business days for posts to be reviewed and accepted.

**Please be advised that we are currently only able to accept news posts from people with UH Usernames.

Berez-Kroeker, McDonnell & Koller to edit 1st MIT Open Handbook in Linguistics

Three (3) Department of Linguistics researchers: Associate Professor Berez-Kroeker, Assistant Professor Brad McDonnell, and Postdoctoral Research Eve Koller, have a contract to edit the first volume in the new series of Open Handbooks in Linguistics by MIT Press Open. Their volume, called “The Open Handbook of Linguistic Data Management,” will be available for free download. They will be joined by a 4th editor, Dr. Lauren Collister, from University of Pittsburgh.

Ka Leo Features New ASL Course

Ka Leo (also known as Manoa Now), the student-run campus newspaper, featured an article on our new ASL course for Fall 2018 taught by incoming Ph.D. student Emily Jo Noschese. Dr. Kamil Deen and Dr. James ‘Woody’ Woodward were both featured as interviewees, and discussed the current KCC offerings, HCC’s new course, and the potential future for ASL and HSL in the UH System.

To read the article, please visit http://bit.ly/UHMASL18.

Dr. Katie Drager Wins College Scholarship & Research Award

Associate Professor Dr. Katie Drager will be receiving the  Junior/Mid-Career Faculty Excellence in Scholarship & Research Award, presented by the College of Languages, Linguistics, & Literature. In addition to authoring or co-authoring eight published articles (and one forthcoming) from 2016, Dr. Drager has also published a book entitled Experimental Research Methods in Sociolinguistics with Bloomsbury this year; she has also previously published a book in 2015 entitled Linguistic variation, identity construction and cognition.  Dr. Drager has also won the College of LLL Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2012.

Congratulations!

As part of her award, she will be a plenary speaker at the LLL Conference on Saturday, April 7th. Her talk, entitled “Experience-based expectations affect speech perception,” will be at 4:30pm in the Sarimanok Room.

Remembering Derek Bickerton

Derek Bickerton, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, passed away on March 5, 2018 at the age of 91.

A seminal thinker and visionary, Derek laid out an important goal for himself, which he described in the introduction to The Roots of Language (1981), one of the most discussed books in the history of linguistics:

Language has made our species what it is, and until we really understand it—that is, understand what is necessary for it to be acquired and transmitted, and how it interacts with the rest of our cognitive apparatus—we cannot hope to understand ourselves. And unless we can understand ourselves, we will continue to watch in helpless frustration while the world we have created slips further and further from our control.

Derek pursued the goal of understanding language and humanity with unwavering intensity throughout his life, developing and extending his ideas in Language and Species (1990), Bastard Tongues (2008), Adam’s Tongue (2009), and More than Nature Needs (2014), as well as in numerous papers, presentations and speeches over four decades. The origin of language, the genesis of pidgins and creoles, and the nature of the genetic endowment for language were endlessly fascinating to him, and he wrote about them with ever-increasing eloquence and insight.

Derek relished disagreement and controversy, recognizing turmoil as the cost of moving forward. People listened to him, and he made a lasting difference—in linguistics and in the lives of his students and colleagues. I speak from experience in this regard. He was the first person to reach out to me when I arrived in Mānoa as a visiting colleague many years ago. During the period that our careers overlapped, I enjoyed numerous stimulating conversations with him on linguistic matters, and I cherish the memory of our social interactions as well.

No matter the turmoil in his academic endeavors, Derek enjoyed a rich family life. His remarkable and elegant wife Yvonne was the love of his life, and their synergy as a couple was evident to anyone who saw them together. Derek paid tribute to their long and happy marriage in a poem, the last few lines of which strike me as a fitting epilogue to his life.

Yet do we regret that we stayed
So long at the feast, gobbled up
All that was there for the taking?
Would we have gained by forsaking
The party early, our cup
Undrunk, our parts half-played?

No. There’s so much that we’d have lost:
Learning at last how love grows
When our animals finally sleep
Learning to savor the deep
Joy of mere closeness—God knows
Such things are worth any cost.

Following the announcement of Derek’s passing, a number of friends and colleagues have contacted the Department of Linguistics with their thoughts and remembrances, which we will share at this site.

–William O’Grady

To view remembrances on the memorial site, or to submit one of your own, please click here.

New Faculty: Dr. James N. Collins

The Department of Linguistics looks forward to having Dr. James N. Collins, currently affiliated with Hebrew University of Jerusalem, join our faculty this coming Fall. Not only specializing in syntax, he also helps fulfill our vision of specializing in the languages of the vast Austronesian family (which includes the indigenous languages of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Taiwan) and on other languages of Asia and the Pacific with his work in the Philippines and Samoa.

Welcome aboard, Dr. Collins!