Category Archives: Student News

Linguistics Department Update 02.27.2018

UHM Linguistics affiliates published together

Language Isolates, edited by Dr. Lyle Campbell, has been released in the Routledge Language Family series (2018). The work surveys the world’s language isolates, which form approximately one-third of the world’s “language families”. Contributions from people connected with University of Hawai’i linguistics (as current or former faculty and students) include a survey of the language isolates of Mesoamerica and Northern Mexico by Raina Heaton, a chapter on the endangerment of language isolates by Eve Okura Koller, a description of Burushaski by Alexander D. Smith, a sketch grammar of Ainu by Thomas Dougherty, and an introduction and a chapter on language isolates and their history by Lyle Campbell.

A.L. Blake awarded Luce Graduate Research Fellowship

A.L. Blake was awarded the Luce Graduate Research Fellowship for the project, “Documenting the botanical language of the Abui people of Alor Island, East Nusa Tenggara province, Indonesia.” Blake will be doing interdisciplinary research this summer in order to document ecological knowledge encoded in the Abui language. Emphasizing Abui nomenclature, classification, characteristics, and use of food- and medicinal- plants, the project generates Abui audio- and video- recordings, with accompanying transcriptions and translations, as well as high-quality photographic images of plants.

Ryan E. Henke presents at SSILA

PhD student Ryan E. Henke presented a paper, “The development of possession in the L1 acquisition of Northern East Cree”, at the 2018 Winter Meeting of the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA) in Salt Lake City, UT. In support of this presentation, Henke was awarded a travel grant from SSILA.

Ryan E. Henke receives GSO Award

Congratulations to PhD student Ryan E. Henke for receiving a Graduate Student Organization grant award. This grant supported his summer research project assisting with community efforts to document Nakota, a Siouan language spoken in Alberta, Canada.

UH linguists publish new book about department’s Catalogue of Endangered Languages project

Cataloguing the World’s Endangered Languages, just published, describes the creation and findings of the Catalogue of Endangered Languages (ELCat, available at www.endangeredlanguages.com). The chapter authors and the editors are current or former linguists in the UHM Department of Linguistics, and members of the ELCat team. The book is edited by Lyle Campbell and Anna Belew, with chapters written by Russell Barlow, Anna Belew, Lyle Campbell, Yen-ling Chen, Bryn Hauk, Raina Heaton, Nala Lee, Sean Simpson, and John Van Way.

Cataloguing the World’s Endangered Languages outlines the research on which ELCat is based, discusses challenges and approaches to large-scale language cataloguing, presents new findings about the state of the world’s endangered languages, and outlines ELCat’s potential applications for students, funding bodies, researchers, and language communities.

The book is published by Routledge, and can be seen at: https://www.routledge.com/Cataloguing-the-Worlds-Endangered-Languages/Campbell-Belew/p/book/9781138922082

2018 LSA Presentations

The following people will be presenting at the upcoming LSA Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City to be held from January 4th to January 7th, 2018:

1/4 (Thursday Evening Plenary Poster Session):
The role of real-world knowledge in second language sentence processing
Dr. Hyunah Ahn (SLS; University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Dr. William O’Grady (LING; University of Hawaii at Manoa)

1/7 (Sunday; Syntax and Typology):
Binding parameters in “symmetrical voice” languages: Austronesian vs. Dinka
Victoria Chen (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Dr. Jonathan Kuo (National Taipei University of Technology)

The embedded topic construction in Puyuma and its implication for a typology of RTO
Victoria Chen (University of Hawaii at Manoa)

 

PhD candidate Bradley Rentz publishes article on Pohnpeian topological relations

PhD candidate Bradley Rentz has recently published an article in the journal Linguistics Vanguard titled “Topological Relations in Pohnpeian“.

As taken from Kudos:

This article examines how prepositions and prepositional nouns in Pohnpeian express topological space, how two entities are related in 2D space. This article used a new statistical method, evolutionary classification trees to model how the meaning of the prepositions and prepositional nouns and how they related to each other.

This article is the first article to examine topological relations in detail for the Pohnpeian language, as well as the first for any Micronesian language. It also uses an innovative statistical method to do so.

Dr. William O’Grady and Ph.D candidate Sejung Yang help in publication of Jejueo language textbook

A sample page from the textbook. Courtesy of Sejung Yang.

Dr. William O’Grady and Ph.D candidate Sejung Yang, along with Dr. Changyong Yang from Jeju National University, have seen the first volume of their Jejueo textbook published on July 5, 2017. The textbook, written for Korean speakers, is the first of its kind for Jejueo, recognized by several international groups (including UNESCO, Endangered Language Group, and Ethnologue) as an independent language rather than a dialect of Korean.

The textbook is the first in a projected four-volume series. You can purchase the textbook from Kyobo (website in Korean).

For more information, including small previews of the book, please read the Center for Korean Studies article.

Linguistics Graduation Ceremony

On May 12th, 2017 the Department of Linguistics marked the graduation of the class of 2017, including 8 doctoral students and 5 MA students. This year’s class of PhD students had a time-to-degree of 4.86 years – an amazing number, given the amount of time spent in the field! Moreover, each student is on their way to successful careers, some in tenure track positions, some in postdoctoral research positions, and some into industry. We wish them all the best, and look forward to their speedy return.

Callender Closson Flavelle_Compressed
Gao_Compressed Heaton Heston
Okura Rarrick Ross
Sato_Compressed Takahashi TheKandas_Compressed
Uno

MA Student Daniel Lin earns Huayu Enrichment Scholarship

Kudos and congratulations to 1st-year MA student Daniel Lin, who has won the Huayu Enrichment Scholarship, a nine-month fellowship to study and conduct field research in Taiwan during the 2017-18 academic year.

The mission of the Huayu Enrichment Scholarship is:

To encourage international students and individuals to undertake Mandarin Chinese language study in Taiwan, the Ministry of Education (MOE) of the Republic of China (Taiwan) established the Ministry Of Education Huayu Enrichment Scholarship (HES) Program in 2005. While providing language study opportunities for Mandarin Chinese and to learn about Taiwan’s culture at certified university or college-affiliated Mandarin training centers.

Good work Dan!

Publication Updates: Raina Heaton and Thomas Kettig

Raina Heaton and Patricia Anderson (Tulane University) have been published in the International Journal of American Linguistics (83:2), with their article “When Animals Become Humans: Grammatical Gender in Tunica.”

Thomas Kettig and Bodo Winter have been published in Language Variation and Change (), with their article “Producing and perceiving the Canadian Vowel Shift: Evidence from a Montreal Community.”

You may click on each title for the abstract, and find the citations below.

Heaton, Raina, and Patricia Anderson, “When Animals Become Humans: Grammatical
Gender in Tunica,” International Journal of American Linguistics 83, no. 2 (April 2017):
341-363. DOI: 10.1086/689832

Kettig, Thomas, and Bodo Winter. “Producing and Perceiving the Canadian Vowel Shift:
Evidence from a Montreal Community.” Language Variation and Change, vol. 29, no. 1,
2017, pp. 79–100., doi:10.1017/S0954394517000023.

Victoria Chen wins 2017 Award for Excellence in Doctoral Dissertation Research from the UHM College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature

Department of Linguistics PhD candidate Victoria Chen has been awarded the 2017 Award for Excellence in Doctoral Dissertation Research from the UHM College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature, for her dissertation, “A reexamination of the Philippine-type voice system and its implications for Austronesian primary-level subgrouping.” Her dissertation investigates the comparative grammar of indigenous languages spoken in Taiwan, which provides new evidence for the classification of higher-order Austronesian languages. Congratulations, Victoria!


 

Original LLL news article

PDF with other awardees