2018 LSA Presentations

The following people will be presenting at the upcoming LSA Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City to be held from January 4th to January 7th, 2018:

1/4 (Thursday Evening Plenary Poster Session):
The role of real-world knowledge in second language sentence processing
Dr. Hyunah Ahn (SLS; University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Dr. William O’Grady (LING; University of Hawaii at Manoa)

1/7 (Sunday; Syntax and Typology):
Binding parameters in “symmetrical voice” languages: Austronesian vs. Dinka
Victoria Chen (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Dr. Jonathan Kuo (National Taipei University of Technology)

The embedded topic construction in Puyuma and its implication for a typology of RTO
Victoria Chen (University of Hawaii at Manoa)

 

Ph.D. Graduate Samantha Rarrick receives Postdoc Fellowship for Sinasina SL in PNG

Dr. Samantha Rarrick has received a Postdoctoral Fellowship with the National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences. Through this two-year fellowship, Sam will work to document and describe Sinasina Sign Language, a previously unreported sign language which she encountered during her dissertation fieldwork. This sign language is one of the first indigenous sign languages to be reported in Papua New Guinea and its documentation and description has potential to drastically contribute to the typology of sign languages in this region.

Find more about Sam’s project here.

Congratulations, Dr. Rarrick!

Carl Polley accepts Tenure Track position

Carl Polley, 2012 PhD graduate, has accepted a tenure track position at Kapiolani Community College (KCC) to teach Chinese language and culture. Carl has been a lecturer at KCC since 2009 teaching various Chinese language, culture, and literature classes. You can also follow this link to read his dissertation, “Metaphors for Happiness in English and Mandarin Chinese.”

Congratulations, Carl!

Alumni Update: Chae-Eun Kim

Dr. Chae-Eun Kim is currently an Assistant Professor (tenure track) in the Department of English, Chosun University in Gwangju, Korea.
Chae-Eun graduated from our department in 2013. A copy of her dissertation (chaired by Dr. William O’Grady) is still available for download: Asymmetries in the Production of Relative Clauses: First and Second Language Acquisition (PDF).

Alumni Update: James Grama

Dr. James Grama is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow affiliated with the ARC Centres of Excellence at the Australian National University. He is working on the Sydney Speaks project, which is focused on language variation in Sydney, Australia. He has been with the project since January 2017.

James graduated from our department in 2015. You can read a copy of his dissertation (chaired by Dr. Katie Drager), Variation and Change in Hawai’i Creole Vowels, by clicking on the title. Utilizing similar acoustical analyses, he’s currently investigating features of Australian English and its function in regard to socioeconomic status, network affiliation, and ethnicity.

Graduate Student Updates: Kavon Hooshiar

Kavon Hooshiar, along with Brenda Clark, Sejung Yang, and Kevin Bätscher, presented at the special session on language documentation in undergraduate education at the Linguistic Society of America’s annual meeting. Their talk, titled The Language Documentation Training Center’s contribution to undergraduate education, presented LDTC and their efforts to attract undergraduate students to the program.

Kavon Hooshiar presented a poster at the 2017 LSA session on data citation and attribution, titled Data management across academic disciplines.

Kavon Hooshiar presented at the 2016 Symposium on Verbs, Clauses and Constructions in Logroño, Spain; his talk was titled Clause chaining in Gimi, a language of Papua New Guinea.

Kavon Hooshiar presented a paper titled An initial look at Manirem, also known as Betaf (bfe) and Vitou (vto) at the 4th Workshop on the Languages of Papua in Manokwari, West Papua, Indonesia.

Kavon Hooshiar, Dr. Katie Drager, and Cassidy Copeland presented at the ASA on Coronal Stop Deletion in Hawaiʻi English. They presented their variationist study on reduction of t/d in consonant clusters in this variety of English. This auditory and acoustic analysis is the first look at this type of variation in Hawaiʻi English.

Graduate Student News (Spring & Summer 2016)

Claire Stabile and Victoria Chen, along with Dr. Kamil Deen and Nian Liu had their paper Cross-linguistic priming of the passive in Mandarin and English bilinguals published in the proceedings of the 13th Annual Generative Approaches to Second-Language Acquisition Conference.

Ryan Henke received two grants to fund a nine-week summer pilot research trip to Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. While there, he also worked at the University of Alberta’s Canadian Indigenous Languages and Literacy Development Institute (CILLDI), where he taught a computer class and served as an intern for two courses.

Victoria Chen presented her paper Actor voice ≠ Antipassive: Against the syntactic ergative analysis for Formosan languages at the Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America in January.

Victoria Chen presented her paper Pivot ≠ Absolutive: Evidence from Formosan at the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistic Society.

Victoria Chen presented her paper Philippine-type “”voice”” affixes as A’-agreement markers: Evidence from productive causatives at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Austronesian Formal Linguistic Association.

Victoria Chen, along with Dr. Shin Fukuda, presented their paper Re-labeling “”Ergative””: Evidence from Formosan at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Austronesian Formal Linguistic Association.

Victoria Chen’s book review To see a world in a grain of sand: Review of Voice and v: Lessons from Acehnese was published in Oceanic Linguistics.

Victoria Chen and Dr. Shin Fukuda’s paper Raising to object out of CP as embedded left dislocations: Evidence from three Formosan languages was published in Proceedings of the 33rd West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics.

Victoria Chen and Dr. Shin Fukuda’s paper Three ways to steal an element from a CP: evidence from Formosan was published in Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association.

Victoria Chen is participating in a one-year collaborative project called Constituency in Formosan languages with Dr. Daniel Kaufman. The project is funded by the Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange.

Colleen O’Brien presented her paper At the Crossroads of Language Death: Displacement, Language Loss, and Identity in Colombia at the Society for Applied Anthropology meeting in Vancouver in March. She received a grant from the GSO to cover her travel expenses.

Colleen O’Brien presented her paper Creating Relevant Curricula for Endangered Languages in Colombia at the Sixth Cambridge Conference on Language Endangerment in July.

Colleen O’Brien was awarded a Lewis and Clark Exploration Grant from the American Philosophical Society to fund her fieldwork on Kamentsa, a language isolate of Colombia.

Bryn Hauk received the Bilinski Summer Research Award. For her project, she traveled to Zemo Alvani, Georgia, met members of the Batsbi (Tsova-Tush) community, and recorded their language.  Summer 2016_BrynHAUKRaina Heaton’s article Variation and change: The case of movement verbs in Kaqchikel appeared in the International Journal of American Linguistics.

Raina Heaton, Dr. Kamil Deen, and Dr. William O’Grady’s article An investigation of relativization in Kaqchikel appeared in the journal Lingua.

Raina Heaton and Patricia Anderson’s paper When animals become human: Grammatical gender in Tunica is currently in press at the International Journal of American Linguistics.

Raina Heaton’s article Active-stative Agreement in Tunica is currently in press at Anthropological Linguistics.

Raina Heaton and Igor Xoyon’s article Assessing language acquisition in the Kaqchikel program at Nimaläj Kaqchikel Amaq’ is currently in press at Language Documentation & Conservation.

Raina Heaton was awarded a Bilinski dissertation fellowship, and also spent a month in Guatemala over the summer finishing her dissertation fieldwork. This included, among other things, four picture elicitation experiments, the results of which will be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas in 2017.S16_RainaHeatonRaina Heaton presented two talks at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas. The first was titled How many ‘antipassives’ are there? Towards a functional typology of antipassive-type constructions in Kaqchikel. The second, co-presented by Dr. Judith Maxwell (Tulane University), was titled A re-evaulation of the perfect in Kaqchikel. Raina also presented a poster at the Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America on her work with the Kaqchikel immersion school in Guatemala.

Raina Heaton presented at the Societas Linguistica Europeae in Naples, Italy. Her presentation was based on work from her dissertation, where she developed a typology of languages with multiple antipassive constructions.

Anna Belew received funding from the Bilinski Educational Foundation to conduct summer research in Cameroon; her study investigated language attitudes and language shift in Iyasa, an endangered Bantu language.S16_AnnaBelewJonny Kim received a Bilinski dissertation fellowship, and has successfully collected data in Korea and Hawaii, including three versions of lexical decision experiments and one eye-tracking experiment.

Jonny Kim presented his poster at the 15th Conference on Laboratory Phonology, Cornell University, and received a LabPhon15 conference travel award.S16_JonnyKimKevin Bätscher presented his mapping project Ing Pámitalátalúkì ding danuman Kapampángan (The map of Kapampangan waterways) along with his collaborators Michael R. Pangilinan (language activist, Kapampangan nation) and JC Gaillard (geographer, University of Auckland) at the 26th Meeting of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society in Manila.S16_KevinBaetscherKevin Bätscher received a Jacobs Research Fund for the project Hul’q’umi’num’ Voices: The Language of Music, for which he interviews Coast Salish elders on Vancouver Island about cultural teachings and the linguistic encoding of the wide range of musical traditions in the area. This is a collaborative project with Sewit (Thomas Jones) of the Snuneymuxw FIrst Nation.

Post Doc Position for Dr. Elaine Lau

Dr. Elaine Lau,  2016 alumna,  has just accepted a postdoctoral position at the Childhood Bilingualism Research Centre (CBRC) at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She will be developing psycholinguistic research on multilingual and heritage child language acquisition, as well as infant language development.

Nala Lee’s New Tenure-Track Position at National University of Singapore

Nala Lee has just been appointed assistant professor at National University of Singapore in the Department of English Language and Literature. Nala completed her Ph.D. in 2015, writing a dissertation entitled ‘A Grammar of Baba Malay with Sociophonetic Considerations’ (supervisor: Lyle Campbell). Congratulations to Nala!

Emerson Odango (PhD, 2015) Awarded 3 Million Dollar Grant from NSF for Geo-literacy Education in Micronesia

It is with great pleasure and pride that we announce that Emerson Odango has just been awarded a three million dollar grant from NSF for a project in the Freely Associated States (FAS) in geographic Micronesia: the Republic of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. A description of the project—Geo-literacy Education in Micronesia (GEM)—can be found here: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1612848&HistoricalAwards=false

(The dollar amount given in it is for the first two years of a five-year project.) Moreover, Ken Rehg (his then-supervisor) tells us that he got the award on his first try.

This project uses a community-based participation research framework to collaborate with communities in the FAS to explore geo-literacy—how one reads the skies, the lands, and the waters so as to make informed decisions that have positive impacts on the local community. GEM will create spaces for communities to investigate how Indigenous, local, and traditional knowledge systems co-exist with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The linguistic connections to GEM include documenting how language encodes the connections among these domains of knowledge and worldviews, and leveraging language—from the lexical to the ethnopoetic—with informal STEM learning.

Please stay tuned for an official press release from Pacific Resources for Education and Learning [prel.org]. Many, many congratulations to Emerson!